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BPG August Update

Hello,

We’d like to announce that we have all three color options of the Warden Cover aka Blast Shield Cover or Blast Diffuser Cover are back in stock.

Also, Every standard color / size variation of the Suppressor Cover – Heavy is now offered via Amazon Prime.

Amazon Product Page Link: http://a.co/hORKnhf

Our suppressed pistol holster (SPH) is finally in stock and ready to ship. Order your holster for the G17, G19, or G34 (or any double stack small frame glock) and the surefire x300 weapon light.

Suppressed Pistol Holster

Thanks for your continued support.

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Fourth of July Sale

Fouth of July Sale

Fourth of July is a great day for us Americans. We celebrate our victory of 1776, when we gained our independence from tyranny and oppression. Freedom is not free as many have fought and died for it.

To show our appreciation, we are offering a 15% discount on all BPG products (in stock.)

Use code: 4JULY

This code also grants free shipping on all orders. Offer expires July 5th, 2018. *Orders will ship by Monday as USPS will be slow this week.*

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Burn Proof Gear Memorial Day Sale

This year we’re doing a Memorial Day Sale to honor the brave men and women who have died while serving in the Military, serving our country.

Please take time out of your weekend to reach out to friends and family that have served, and thank them for their service.

Offer them this code as a thank you from us: memorialday2018

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Black Friday / Cyber Monday Sale

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_gallery type=”flexslider_slide” interval=”3″ images=”9189,9187,9184,9143,9141,9112,7793,7733,7740,7698,7693″ img_size=”large” simple_arrows=”1″ title=”Products Slider – NOV 2017″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Thanks to all our past customers and those who recently joined the BPG family over the Thanksgiving holidays. If you took advantage of our Black Friday Sale, you’re going to love what we’ve got in store for you for Cyber Monday!

Our CYBER MONDAY Sale will commence at noon – 26 NOV and end at midnight.

We will be sending out email blasts every few hours to our website subscribers (if you’re an existing customer or have created an account on our website, you’ll receive our email updates). The discount codes will be posted on our Instagram story and Facebook sometime tomorrow as well.

COUPON CODE: CYBERMONDAY

  • 30% OFF any BPG Product in stock – not already on Sale. Excludes Custom Orders. 

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Burn Proof Gear – Suppressed Pistol Holster – Soldier Systems Daily

Burn Proof Gear – Suppressed Pistol Holster

Burn Proof Gear specializes in suppressor covers. However, they also offer a holster compatible with suppressor-equipped pistols. That’s feat enough alone, but they’ve also made the holster large enough for a suppressor equipped with their BPG Suppressor Cover Light.

Granted, that’s a serious draw stroke, but few suppressor holsters exist on the market.The holster is equipped with the G-Code RTI attachment and fitted with a G-Code drop-leg kit.

There are a bunch of weapons and suppressor out there, so check out the website for the particulars, as well as color availability. www.burnproofgear.com/product/suppressed-pistol-holster

Source: Burn Proof Gear – Suppressed Pistol Holster – Soldier Systems Daily

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Suppressor Cover Shootout Review

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_video link=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2cwxjPvD8L8″][vc_column_text]Temperature ranges are due to hot spots on the silencer. Higher temperatures where in the middle & very end of the can.

Neither of the High Temp covers from @burnproofgear or @silencerco came loose or moved.

BurnProof uses bungee cord & SilencerCo uses Velcro to secure their wraps. These did not burn. (Using a Mirage only SilencerCo Cover will burn & melt it by the second mag). BurnProof
Securest mounting
Cools off faster
Harder to install & remove
Hard to make adjustments while installed
SilencerCo
Secure mounting
Cools slower (metal buckles get very hot)
Easy to install & remove
Easier to make adjustments while installed

Both covers have an inner sleeve which is why they’re rated “High Temp.” The BurnProof sleeve was harder to install because it doesn’t fully surround the can. It’s thin material does lead to fast cooling times.

The SilencerCo inner sleeve is thicker & easily slides on like a sock. The outside is coated in a grippy material which helps keep the actual cover from moving. This material keeps the cover hotter longer.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/4″][vc_column_text]After 3 mags 556 Full Auto
BurnProof Saker Temp: 412-496°
SilencerCo Saker Temp: 372-469°

BurnProof Cover Temp: 113-136°
SilencerCo Cover Temp: 86-112°[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/4″][vc_column_text]After 2 minutes
BurnProof Saker Temp: 292-379°
SilencerCo Saker Temp: 315°-374

BurnProof Cover Temp: 141-312°
SilencerCo Cover Temp: 147-272°[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/4″][vc_column_text]After 5 minutes
BurnProof Saker Temp: 206-266°
SilencerCo Saker Temp: 223-349°

BurnProof Cover Temp: 160-259°
SilencerCo Cover Temp: 144-300°[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/4″][vc_column_text]After 20 minutes
BurnProof Saker Temp: 102-149°
SilencerCo Saker Temp: 124-184°

BurnProof Cover Temp: 123-149°
SilencerCo Cover Temp: 165-237°

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_text_separator title=”Suppressor Cover Shootout Review by Capitol Armory and Mancha Suppressors ” el_width=”100″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_column_text]

SCO: @silencerco
BPG: @burnproogear
BHG: @bhgear

Initial heat reduction
SCO
BPG
BHG

Long term heat reduction (10+ min)
BPG
SCO
BHG (not tested)

Installation
BHG
SCO
BPG

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_column_text]Removal
BHG
SCO
BPG

Retention
BPG
SCO
BHG

Price point
BHG
SCO
BPG

Cover cool off
BHG
SCO
BPG

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_column_text]Internal sleeve cool off
BPG
SCO
BHG n/a

Thinnest
BHG
BPG
SCO

Strengths
BHG: Very effective & super quick cool down
SCO: Extremely easy to install, remove, adjust
BPG: Not coming off without a fight

Weaknesses
BHG: Velcro straps can melt if exposed
SCO: metal brackets retain heat
BPG: Installation[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_cta h2=”Please note: This review is a couple months old.” custom_background=”#dd3333″ custom_text=”#dd3535″]BPG has addressed the issues mentioned in the review and our current Suppressor Covers are much easier to install and remove. The internal sleeving which comes standard with the Suppressor Cover Heavy is also one piece and very easy to install. Lastly, our covers are half the weight of their closest competitor and exceed their performance considerably in retention and heat dissipation and mirage reduction.[/vc_cta][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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BPG Trade-Up Program

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[/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_cta h2=”BPG Upgrade Program Status:”]INACTIVE[/vc_cta][vc_column_text]

BPT Trade Up Program (like AT&T Next) but for Suppressor Covers.

Upgrade Program Rules:

  • Will only accept soft goods (No manta or any other silicone adult toy looking tubes) with a retail value of $75 or greater.
  • What do you have to do to take advantage of it?

  • Please be sure to include the following if emailing us: What cover you’re sending us, full name and shipping address, your instagram handle, and make sure to enter contact info (phone and email).

  • Once we receive your Trade Up request, allow us up to 48 hours to reply. We will send you further instructions once we’ve received your request.

  • After receiving your cover(s) we will email you a promocode to use depending on the value of the item(s) you send us. The code must be used when checking out via our website e-store (one time use only). It’s that Easy!

Thanks for checking out our offer and have a great day!

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Marine Unit Is First To Deploy With Suppressors On Every Weapon

Burn Proof Gear Suppressor Covers for Marines

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”This Marine Unit Is The First To Deploy With Suppressors On Every Weapon” use_theme_fonts=”yes” css=”.vc_custom_1494600696520{margin-top: 0px !important;}” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Ftaskandpurpose.com%2Fsuppressors-marine-unit-weapons%2F|title:Task%20and%20Purpose%20-%20Marines%20deploy%20with%20suppressors|target:%20_blank|”][vc_column_text]It’s about time we have some suppressed Marines!

The members of Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 2nd Marines, currently deployed in Norway, are officially the first Marine Corps infantry to deploy with suppressors on every service member’s weapons, Military.com reports.

The news comes just about six months after Maj. Gen. John Love, the commanding general of 2nd Marine Division, announced plans for several “experiments” in silencing every weapon in an infantry battalion’s arsenal, from M2 .50-caliber machine guns to the standard-issue M4 service rifle, beginning with a pre-deployment training exercise by three rifle companies last October.

The logic of employing suppressors is simple: With infantry units usually tightly packed on the battlefield, dulling the cacophony of automatic weapons fire and allowing increased verbal communication is a small shift that could fundamentally change the way Marine units operate, according to Love.

“It used to be a squad would be dispersed out over maybe 100 yards, so the squad leader couldn’t really communicate with the members at the far end because of all the noise of the weapons,” he said in November. “Now they can actually just communicate, and be able to command and control, and effectively direct those fires.”[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_separator el_width=”100″][vc_single_image source=”external_link” external_img_size=”full” onclick=”custom_link” img_link_target=”_blank” custom_src=”http://49m47r1ce5b927clot3yajgk.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/2950285-1-840×560.jpg” link=”http://49m47r1ce5b927clot3yajgk.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/2950285-1-840×560.jpg”][vc_column_text]The Marines appear very pleased with this experiment. Reporting from the Vaernes Garrison near Trondheim, Norway, Hope Hedge Seck writes that after three months of training and live fire exercises armed with silenced weapons, members of Bravo Company “never want to go back”:

“It took us back to remembering what it was like not to be suppressed, when you see people trying to communicate,” [Bravo Company commanding officer Capt. Jack] Edgar said. “For guys in charge of other Marines, being able to talk is a big way that we fight. The suppressed weapons have helped that a lot.”

For Staff Sgt. Troy Hauck, a platoon sergeant with Bravo Company’s Weapons Platoon, not having to worry about ear protection when firing his rifle is a nice bonus. But a potentially bigger boon is the element of surprise that comes with a suppressed weapon.

“Just doing some of the training attacks that we’ve done on this deployment has been good,” he said. “I’m on one side of the hill and [part of the company is] on the other side of the hill, and I can’t hear them firing their weapons. It’s pretty nice, real stealthy.”

Suppressors don’t just offer a tactical advantage on the noisy battlefield, but a medical one as well. As Popular Mechanics noted after Love’s initial announcement in November, weapons like the M4 and M240 machine gun produce noise well above what the federal government considers a healthy ceiling of 150 decibels — prolonged exposure to which can yield significant hearing loss.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text css=”.vc_custom_1494600520545{padding-top: 15px !important;}”]Of course, suppressors don’t totally drown out the racket of gunfire (one of the many reasons they’re less often referred to as “silencers” nowadays), but they’re efficient enough to drop the noise of the M4 carbine by more than 30 decibels, right above the drone of a commercial jackhammer, according to PopMech.

It’s unclear if and when this experiment will extend to other battalions. Chief Warrant Officer 5 Christian Wade, the 2nd Marine Division gunner, told Military.com in November that equipping an entire infantry battalion of 800 troops will run the Marine Corps around $700,000. That’s a relatively small price to pay for better communication and the element of surprise — and to avoid going deaf like poor dumb Nelson in “Black Hawk Down”:[/vc_column_text][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/tQcoNSlIt9c”][vc_btn title=”Read original article” style=”flat” shape=”round” color=”chino” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Ftaskandpurpose.com%2Fsuppressors-marine-unit-weapons%2F||target:%20_blank|”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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Suppressor Cover | Handle the Heat | Load out Room Review

Loadout Room Review by The Loadout Room

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_single_image source=”external_link” onclick=”custom_link” custom_src=”https://loadoutroom.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/File-Aug-08-1-04-09-PM-e1470686843740-834×1112.jpeg” link=”https://loadoutroom.com/21368/suppressor-covers-handle-the-heat/”][vc_column_text]If you’ve done any precision shooting through magnified optics, you’re probably aware of the effect mirage has on your visibility.  The shimmering heat waves reduce optical clarity and can be a big distraction.  This problem is compounded when shooting suppressed as the can is one big fire-trap.  In a similar fashion, if you’ve spent much time shooting and moving with a suppressed rifle, the odds are good you’ve felt the scorch of a blazing can bumping into your leg.  Quality suppressor covers can be a good solution for both mirage management and safety.

To learn more about the benefits of suppressor covers, I picked up a heavy cover from Cole-Tac named the “HTP” Python.  I also picked up a bit lighter offering from Junior Arago at Burn Proof Gear.  Much like the different roles the suppressors themselves can fill, these two “can wraps” represent different ends of the performance spectrum.  One is designed for maximum protection and mirage reduction and thus comes with the expected increase in weight.  The other is light and durable, meant to provide a layer of physical safety and reduce mirage without being a heavy or bulky.  We’ll compare the two offerings but first, a little about each company.

Cole-Tac is a small shop running out of Unity, NH.  Started up in 2014 by Dustin Coleman and his wife, Cole-Tac is expanding and hiring on new employees.  A recent product announcement by a certain major SILENCER COmpany showed a product eerily similar to the one I had sitting on my keyboard.  I’d say Cole-Tac’s products are gaining acclaim and being licensed out, though I haven’t got confirmation on this.

Burn Proof Gear (BPG) is the manufacturing vehicle for Junior Arago of Miami, FL.  He started manufacturing his own suppressor wraps after the first one he purchased loosened up and blasted off the end of his can, despite having been cinched tight.  Unsatisfied with the products he was seeing, Junior decided to test his hand at manufacturing.  He plans on bringing more products to market in the future, including a kydex suppressed pistol holster.

Cole-Tac’s HTP suppressor wrap is a three-layered design.  The first two layers are a fiberblass mat with the outside coated in high-temp silicon.  The cover is 1000D cordura with Boa straps to keep the cover cinched tight.  The inside layer is rated to 3000 degrees Fahrenheit.  While the outer cordura wrap isn’t rated to as high a temp, if you manage to scorch it Cole-Tac will replace it.  The website lists this wrap at 5.4oz, though each can cover is cut to match the length of your specific make and model.  My cover weighed in at 4.55 oz.  The outer wrap is available in 8 patterns/colors.  The AAC suppressor went from 1.5″ in diameter to 2.37″ with the Cole-Tac wrap.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_single_image source=”external_link” onclick=”custom_link” img_link_target=”_blank” custom_src=”https://loadoutroom.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/P1110869.jpg” link=”https://loadoutroom.com/21368/suppressor-covers-handle-the-heat/”][vc_column_text]Cole-Tac HTP. Photo by Rex Nanorum

BPG’s Suppressor Wrap (medium) is rated to 1200 degrees Fahrenheit and is made of a proprietary Kevlar/Nomex blended fabric with Kevlar bungee cords.  100% fire retardant construction and machine washable, the BPG wrap is an exercise in simplicity.  The BPG cover weighs in at 2.43 oz and is available in three colors.  The AAC can with BPG wrap went from 1.5″ to 1.98″, noticeably slimmer than the HTP.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column][vc_single_image source=”external_link” onclick=”custom_link” img_link_target=”_blank” custom_src=”https://loadoutroom.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/P1110824-834×1112.jpg” link=”https://loadoutroom.com/21368/suppressor-covers-handle-the-heat/”][vc_column_text]Burn Proof Gear wrap. Photo by Rex Nanorum

Heading out to the range, I brought a Ranger buddy, IR thermometer, AAC 762sdn6 suppressor and a 16″ barreled AR pattern rifle.  I also brought my test subjects, the HTP wrap from Cole-Tac and the BPG Suppressor Cover (medium).  We ran strings of fire without a suppressor, let the can cool and then ran additional strings of fire through each suppressor wrap to compare how the heat and mirage were cut down.  The suppressor was allowed to cool to ambient temperature between each string of fire.

First up was the naked can.  One magazine fired in 20 seconds was the baseline test.  Starting at an ambient temperature of 86.9 degrees Fahrenheit, the first string of fire brought the can up to 159 degrees F.  Even at that temperature there was mirage present and the can was too hot to handle.  Not exactly third degree burn territory, but too hot to put back in the rifle case for sure.  159 degrees is not considered  hot for a suppressor at all.  With continued firing they can easily exceed 800 degrees F.

After enough time had elapsed for the can to cool down to ambient temperature, the BPG medium cover was next.  The day was heating up quickly so 90 degrees Fahrenheit was the new ambient temperature.  An identical string of fire brought the front cap of the suppressor up to 168 degrees F, an increase of 5% due to the insulating properties of the wrap.  The outside of the cover was 120 degrees, a reduction of 29% over the naked metal.  At this temperature, the light mirage was reduced notably and the can could be handled (although it was still a little bit of “hot potato”).  This is nowhere near the temperature limit of the BPG wrap but shows the difference a wrap can make between “instant skin melt” and “ow that sucks but I don’t require medical attention.”  Further strings of fire showed the BPG is a solid performer at mitigating mirage.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_single_image source=”external_link” onclick=”custom_link” img_link_target=”_blank” custom_src=”https://loadoutroom.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/P1110823-1024×768.jpg” link=”https://loadoutroom.com/21368/suppressor-covers-handle-the-heat/”][vc_column_text]

Burn Proof Gear wrap. Photo by Rex Nanorum

Heading out to the range, I brought a Ranger buddy, IR thermometer, AAC 762sdn6 suppressor and a 16″ barreled AR pattern rifle.  I also brought my test subjects, the HTP wrap from Cole-Tac and the BPG Suppressor Cover (medium).  We ran strings of fire without a suppressor, let the can cool and then ran additional strings of fire through each suppressor wrap to compare how the heat and mirage were cut down.  The suppressor was allowed to cool to ambient temperature between each string of fire.

First up was the naked can

One magazine fired in 20 seconds was the baseline test.  Starting at an ambient temperature of 86.9 degrees Fahrenheit, the first string of fire brought the can up to 159 degrees F.  Even at that temperature there was mirage present and the can was too hot to handle.  Not exactly third degree burn territory, but too hot to put back in the rifle case for sure.  159 degrees is not considered  hot for a suppressor at all.  With continued firing they can easily exceed 800 degrees F.

After enough time had elapsed for the can to cool down to ambient temperature, the BPG medium cover was next.  The day was heating up quickly so 90 degrees Fahrenheit was the new ambient temperature.  An identical string of fire brought the front cap of the suppressor up to 168 degrees F, an increase of 5% due to the insulating properties of the wrap.  The outside of the cover was 120 degrees, a reduction of 29% over the naked metal.  At this temperature, the light mirage was reduced notably and the can could be handled (although it was still a little bit of “hot potato”).  This is nowhere near the temperature limit of the BPG wrap but shows the difference a wrap can make between “instant skin melt” and “ow that sucks but I don’t require medical attention.”  Further strings of fire showed the BPG is a solid performer at mitigating mirage.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]Once my can had cooled, we cleared the firing range of the six velvet bucks that were chompin’ on apples and slid on the Cole-Tac HTP.  The fiberglass/silicone layer slides on tight before the cordura cover is placed on top and cinched down snug.  The baseline test was performed again, taking the 762SD-n6 from 90 degrees to 180 degrees at the front cap.  This is an increase of 13% over bare metal, showing the increase in insulating properties over the BPG wrap.  The exterior surface of the HTP never even got to triple digits, it stayed right at 95 degrees.  This showed 40% decrease in temperature compared to a butt-naked suppressor.  Continued strings of fire showed that while the heat did eventually soak through the insulation of the HTP, it was always at a drastically reduced temperature.  Mirage was eliminated in the first string of fire and reduced tremendously after that.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]

Neither product showed signs of wear during the test.

While I would have liked to perform additional testing on our range day, rapidly increasing temperatures outside were keeping the AAC can too hot for too long between strings of fire.  While both Burn Proof Gear and Cole-Tac are producing suppressor wraps, these two products aren’t really apples-to-apples in their application.

The HTP seems to me like the Ferrari of can covers.  Made for the highest level of performance, I feel the HTP would be the better option for a precision rifle where cutting down on mirage would be the highest priority and a few extra ounces are no big deal.  I do wonder about the long term field durability of fiberglass wrap, though so far I have no reason to think it won’t hold up.

Meanwhile, the BPG offering is built like a Toyota truck:  it works well enough and will keep on working for a very long time.  While it doesn’t cut down on temperature or mirage to the same degree, it comes in lighter, slimmer and made in a manner I believe will prove more durable.  For that reason, I would say the BPG wrap feels right at home on my SBR’s and PDW’s where inches and ounces are always at a premium and mirage isn’t as big an issue.  Neither showed serious deficiency in design or construction and both performed within advertised specs.  For these reasons, I can say either represents a worthy purchase. The BPG Suppressor Cover – Medium is available on Amazon Prime for $100 and the Cole-Tac HTP is $96.  Both Cole-Tac and Burn Proof Gear offer heavier and lighter variants on their respective products shown here, as well as for blast diverters covers. Don’t be a fool, wrap your (suppression) tool.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]